U.S. Education in 2013

U.S. Education in 2013

Of working in the US education system, Boston-based teacher Lillie Marshall, in a December 3rd ImpatientOptimists.org blogpost states,

I see this as an ideal time to join an evolving, exciting profession."
There have been several new trends in US education in the past decade. Improved teaching methods and education system changes are emerging at a rapid pace, even as the worldwide economy continues on a sluggish path. Regarding the economy in the United States, in his December 29th Atlantic Monthly article, Zachary Karabell makes this optimistic assessment:  "every indicator of American economic activity has been strengthening. Stocks are up between 8 percent and 14 percent in 2012, depending on the index. Gross domestic product is increasing more than 2 percent a year; unemployment has fallen below 8 percent; wages are steady even as inflation is close to non-existent. Energy prices have declined, and home prices have increased. Debt burdens for American households are now at the lowest level in 29 years, giving the vast majority of consumers more flexibility in their spending." On the outcome of the much-publicized U.S. fiscal cliff, he adds:  "the chance of nothing being done to address this over the next months is close to zero....So here we have what is labeled a worst-case scenario -- going over the cliff -- that yields long-term advantages (necessary corrections that will aid the evolution of the US economy), with its worst features easily remedied." In upcoming 2013 posts we'll be addressing trends in US education within these economic shifts and the people and organizations who are behind these changes. Philanthropic efforts play a large part in the grand scheme of U.S. education, have even become the "in" thing to do, and are being forged by such organizations as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, so we'll be discussing this subject as well. We'll also address such programs as the University of Maryland's newly introduced I-series courses, which are designed to "make introductory courses extraordinary," according to a recent Chronicle.com article. (The "I" refers to imagination, inspiration and innovation.)  And flip teaching, a form of blended learning, which has become a US education trend, especially at the undergraduate level. According to Wikipedia, flip teaching "encompasses any use of technology to leverage the learning in a classroom, so a teacher can spend more time interacting with students instead of lecturing."
We believe 2013 will be an exciting year full of  innovation, pro-activity and forward-thinking idea generation. Please join us in this on-going discussion by  letting us know your thoughts on education and why you'd like to study in the USA.