Yadav Nyoupane from Nepal: Studying for an MBA at the University of Findlay

Yadav Nyoupane from Nepal: Studying for an MBA at the University of Findlay

Yadav Nyoupane from Nepal is studying for an MBA at the University of Findlay in Findlay, Ohio.

Why did you decide to study in the USA?

While doing research about MBA programs, I came to know that the program first originated in the United States in the 20th century. I believe that 100 years of refining MBA courses in the United States has the potential to impart knowledge in the best possible manner. Additionally, American programs are well renowned throughout the world for their excellence. Most importantly, you will have the opportunities to gain experience through different internship opportunities with the use of advanced technology.

Why did you choose the University of Findlay?

I was fascinated by the student to faculty ratio of 16:1 where you have a better chance to get individualized attention from your faculty member. Findlay is a small city and it's so inexpensive and safe to study and live in comparison to bigger cities. I would not get any better chance to pursue my degree at such a reputed institution at an affordable cost.

What do you like best?

I like the flexibility of classes which can be taken in a hybrid of online and on campus.

What do you miss most?

I miss my family the most. All the guidance and suggestions I was getting was priceless. The way mom used to imply positivity on me when I am not able to achieve something that I wanted to is worth remembering.

What was your biggest surprise?

Talking to a stranger is very common here which I believe is a good thing because it makes us feel connected. The grading system is totally different in the United States. It depends mostly on weekly assignments and classroom presentation.

... your biggest disappointment?

I believe choosing the United States for my studies is one of the best decisions I have made. The lifestyle, education system, and work environment here provided me new insights about life. So, I can say that there is nothing that has disappointed me so far.                                            

How have you handled:

... language differences?

I tried to be a part of different volunteering activities where I could get a chance to meet new people and learn from them about their culture and language. I’m thankful to the university that they provide so many opportunities for international students to interact with domestic students. I think this is an excellent way to minimize a language barrier.

... finances?

My parents were fully aware of the total tuition fees and estimated living expenses and they were prepared for it. Later on, I got an assistantship from the Office of International Admissions and Immigration Services so it was kind of easier for me to finance my expenses.  

... adjusting to a different educational system?

It was not as difficult as I thought would be because I got an opportunity to learn from my senior colleagues. Most importantly, I chose this educational system because of the more pragmatic way of teaching and focusing on things that we will be facing in the real world. Also, I got lucky to be guided by good professors who motivated me and made it easy to adjust to the different world of education.

What are your activities?

I love traveling. I have been to different places like New York, California, and Chicago. I usually play basketball and ping pong for fun and work out in my leisure time. 

How easy or difficult was making friends?

I found it easier because American people are so friendly. If you engage in volunteering activities on campus, which I think is a good platform to interact with new people, it would be pretty easy to make new friends.                                 

How relevant is your U.S. education to your personal goals and to the needs of your country? 

I want to be a financial analyst specifically in buying and selling stocks. The U.S. education, both inside and outside of class, helps me explore new things in the field of the stock market. It is an astounding opportunity for me to have practical trading experience as I find plenty of online apps that allow investing in fraction or in a small amount. In Nepal, it takes a lot of time to buy a stock and it cannot be done online. The skills and experiences that I am gathering here will certainly help me in bringing some changes in ways of trading in Nepal.

What is your advice to other students who are considering a U.S. education?

I would suggest to do research about the program and the university you are interested in, estimated living expenses, and the weather so that nothing would surprise you. Be prepared and flexible to learn new things. You will get a plenty of life-changing learning opportunities as an international student coming into a different environment.

Show More

SUSA_img_200x55.jpg
Download Study in the USA ® Magazines

Related Schools